Posts Tagged ‘see’

When is it Worthwhile to Spend More on Pressed Powder?

August 15th, 2012

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Judy just wants to know…Are all pressed powder makeup products the same or are some brands worth spending more money on?

The Right Brain replies:

While we stress the importance of looking at ingredients to understand the quality of a product, there are situations where the ingredients don’t tell the full story. Sometimes HOW the ingredients are put together can be tremendously important to the quality of the finished product. You don’t see this in simple mixtures, like shampoos, but you do see it on more complex products like pressed powders. Case in point: a recent article in Cosmetics & Toiletries revealed that the quality of a powder cosmetic products depends in part on how the powders are pulverized.

Pulverizing powders

The powders used in cosmetics can form agglomerates, or clumps. These clumps prevent the powder from having a smooth application.  To avoid these clumps powders are processed to break them into tiny particles. This is commonly done using a piece of equipment called a “Hammer Mill” which basically slams metal hammers against the powder’s surface to break the pieces apart. Most manufacturers used to this type of equipment.

However a more advanced process, known as “Jet Milling,” can break the particles into even smaller sizes and make them more spherical.

Not surprisingly Jet Mills cost more, and not as readily available, as Hammer Mills. That means if a company wants to make a higher quality powder they either have to invest in more expensive equipment or they have to use a contract manufacturer which owns this specialized grinder. In either case the use of jet milling to create a softer feeling product results in an increased price. Therefore it’s unlikely you’ll see this used in bargain products.

The Beauty Brains bottom line

While in many (most?) cases it’s not worth spending more on expensive products, there are some exceptions. If you value elegant feel characteristics you may want to spend more on your makeup to ensure you’re getting a jet milled product. You can do a quick test to see if you like the feel of a powder by running your finger over its surface.

Reference: Comparatively Speaking: Pressed vs. Loose Powder

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Please note that this article is not written by celebritymakeup.org

Temptalia’s Beauty Closet – Storage & Organization Tips & Tricks

March 16th, 2012

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Temptalia’s Beauty Closet – Storage & Organization Tips & Tricks

There is really no post/video that is requested more than to see my “collection.”  I really don’t think of it as a collection so much as the Temptalia Archives or the Temptalia Beauty Closet.  If I’m buying makeup, the first question I ask is, “Do readers want to see this reviewed?”  It’s only a rare occasion that I will buy a product with no thought about whether it’s something that makes sense for the blog–I prefer to dedicate as much time as possible to testing products for reviews (and there is never enough time!!).

I do personally enjoy looking at how other people organize their makeup, especially as it grows in quantity and becomes unwieldy, so I hope that you’ll find some storage and organization solutions that are helpful.  I’ve been using this system for two years or so, and I can’t see myself drastically changing it any more.  It’s what I always wanted: a flexible, expandable system that looks good but doesn’t have everything on display so it can look clean and contained.  The first seven minutes are all disclosures/disclaimers (reiterated below in text) just so I’m clear and cover all the bases :)

The “fine print” as it were: some products I have purchased, some products were received as product samples. I disclose whether it was received or purchased in individual reviews. This is definitely not your usual “collection,” as I am a beauty blogger, and I review 3-4 products per day, sometimes as many as 30 in a day (hello, MAC collections!). :) I do donate to a local legal aid organization that provides free/low-cost legal services to victims of domestic violence.

Products mentioned:

  • Besta Shelf Unit ($130.00)
  • Inreda Drawer without Front 23 5/8×2 3/4×15 3/4″ ($10.00)
  • Besta Tofta Drawer Front 23 5/8×6 1/4″ ($15.00)
  • Expedit Shelving Unit ($69.99)
  • Helmer ($39.99)
  • Linus Shallow Drawer Organizers ($2.99-$6.99)
  • Linus Deep Drawer Organizers ($3.49-$6.49)
  • Our Clear Storage Boxes ($1.69-$21.99)


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Get the Red Out of Your Life – Treating Rosacea

December 16th, 2011

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Today’s post is written by Debra Jaliman, MD, author of Skin Rules:  Trade Secrets from a Top New York Dermatologist.  

Every day I treat rosacea. It’s probably one of the most common skin conditions that dermatologists see. New patients either walk in with bright red faces or with caked-on makeup that still manages to do a poor job of concealment. The good news is that nowadays, nobody has to walk around with a scarlet face, since there is an ever-growing number of effective treatment options.

First, though, a prolonged question-and-answer period with your doctor should take place. The first thing your dermatologist will ask about is your diet. Food and drink are usually the prime triggers in rosacea. Everybody is different and so are rosacea triggers, but here is a list of the most common offenders:

  • Spicy foods
  • Piping hot beverages — better get used to drinking soups at a cooler temperature.
  • Caffeine — coffee, tea and, I’m afraid, chocolate.
  • Citrus fruits
  • Tomatoes (including ketchup)
  • Red wine and beer. White wine appears to be less of a problem.
  • Soy sauce and miso
  • Steam — saunas and very hot, prolonged showers and baths are not good.
  • Excessive niacin (vitamin B3) consumption which leads to skin flushing. Low doses or
    taking the non-flushing type of niacin should not cause problems.
  • Sun exposure
  • Wind
  • Extremes in temperature — very hot weather and very cold weather make rosacea worse, as anybody who has a scarlet nose in winter knows.

As is obvious from the last two items, protecting the skin from the elements is essential. But you have to do it the right way — chemical sunscreens will only make rosacea worse. I recommend sunscreens with zinc oxide, which is both anti-inflammatory and provides good, broad-spectrum protection. Make sure it is SPF 30 or higher and slather it on every single day, even on overcast days.

Skincare products can also exacerbate rosacea. Use the mildest cleanser you can find. Avoid products with glycolic or salicylic acid. Stay away from makeup with silicone-based ingredients, such as dimethicone, which can clog pores and make rosacea bumps worse.

Dermatologists have a wide arsenal of weapons against rosacea. The first line of attack is with topical products. In my practice, I first treat the inflammation and dryness, using creams and serums with resveratrol, green tea and hyaluronic acid. Topical antibiotics, such as metronidazole, kill bacteria on the skin surface and lessen inflammation, as can prescription-strength azelaic acid. With severe cases, oral antibiotics can be used. The FDA recently approved the use of doxycycline in very small doses to treat inflammation in rosacea patients; sometimes the course of low-dose antibiotics can go on for months. Most people seem to tolerate it well, but others will have side effects, in which case topical antibiotics, light therapy and lasers are the fall-back answers.

Light therapy can have amazing results. I use a combination of red, infra-red and blue light, typically in sessions lasting between 30 minutes and an hour. The procedure is completely painless and most patients begin to see an improvement after the first session or two.

The next step is using lasers, which are more expensive than light therapy, but worth it. In my practice I use the Genesis laser to reduce background redness. My patients tell me it feels like warm water is being applied and actually seem to find it relaxing. Skin may look pink right after treatment, but that fades in a few minutes. I usually recommend three to six treatments, although most patients see a big difference by the third treatment.

Broken blood vessels that look like red spider webs are common in rosacea patients. The CoolGlide laser is used to seal off the vessels in one to three treatments, four weeks apart. It’s not the pleasant experience of the Genesis laser, but the discomfort is minimal and any redness from the treatment is gone in twenty minutes.

Once rosacea has been brought under control, most patients report they find it easy to avoid their triggers. “I finally feel in control of my skin,” one of them told me recently.

© 2011 Debra Jaliman, MD, author of Skin Rules: Trade Secrets from a Top New York Dermatologist

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Please note that this article is not written by celebritymakeup.org

What makeup trend would you like to see make a come back?

November 11th, 2011

Celebrity Makeup News and Blogs:

What makeup trend would you like to see make a come back? What are you hoping will be the “it” thing again?

Coral lips? I’m sooo not a trend hunter – I just don’t follow them. I feel like I see repeats of the same ones each season – skin/nudes for spring, corals/pinks for summer, berries/plums for fall, reds/glitter for holiday.

Thanks to Gillian for today’s question! Got a question idea? Submit yours here.


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What makeup trend/fad do you not see becoming popular?

August 19th, 2011

Celebrity Makeup News and Blogs:

What makeup trend/fad do you not see becoming popular? Why/why not?

Even though we have seen heavier, thicker brows on the runway, I think it’s going to be quite some time (if at all) before we see thick brows to that degree. Crackle polishes, too, I don’t think will ever be fully popular at a mainstream level.

Thanks to Lyza for today’s question!

Got a question idea? Submit yours here.


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Please note that this article is not written by celebritymakeup.org