Posts Tagged ‘red’

I’m Seeing Red this Valentine’s Day

February 20th, 2012

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Welcome to Fab Over Forty: I’m Seeing Red this Valentine’s Day

Red is for Valentines Day   Happy Valentine’s Day everyone!  Red is the prominent color of love, the heart and of course, Valentine’s Day.  Let’s celebrate with a few lovely red pieces and what would the day be without a heart. 1. Dior nail polish –  This pretty, blue-red toned nail polish named Red Royalty […]

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How Do Nail Effects By Sally Hansen Work?

February 5th, 2012

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The Beauty Brains are linking and hopefully you’re loving it! All our questions this month come from other beauty bloggers, like Jenn of Literature Couture. Check out her creative character makeup tutorials!

Jenn asks…I’m loving the new Sally Hansen Nail Effects, but I’m have two questions about them. One, how exactly does the company manage to use real nail polish that isn’t dried and crumbly by the time I open the package? Two, is there a way for me to make my own strips to avoid the hassle of manicuring my non-dominant hand?

The Right Brain responds:

Regular nail polishes are a mix of film forming agents, adhesive polymers, and colorants all dissolved in a solvent cocktail (usually ethyl and butyl acetate with a dash of isopropyl alcohol.) To “stripify” the polish, Sally Hansen’s Nail Effects use a formula that’s a little more plastic-y than a regular nail polish. It looks like they’ve applied the polish to flexible substrate (polyethylene terephthalate) and dried off all the solvent. The result is a strip of nail polish that remains flexible but still sticky enough to adhere to your nail.

Can you DIY nail effects?

Sure, it’s actually quite simple. First, get an advanced degree in organic chemistry. Then, gain access to a mixture of over 2 dozen flammable chemicals and the associated equipment you’ll need to mix them properly, then…ok, I guess it isn’t quite so easy. This chemistry is quite complex and even the most accomplished DIY formulator would have problems doing this at home. Looks like you’re stuck with Sally’s strips for now.

Sally Hansen Nail Effects Ingredients

NITROCELLULOSE, POLYETHYLENE TEREPHTHALATE, ADIPIC ACID/NEOPENTYL GLYCOL/TRIMELLITIC ANHYDRIDE COPOLYMER, BIS(GLYCIDOXYPHENYL)PROPANE/BISAMINOMETHYLNORBORNANE COPOLYMER, ACETYL TRIBUTYL CITRATE, TRIPHENYL PHOSPHATE, ISOPROPYL ALCOHOL, BUTYL ACETATE, CALCIUM ALUMINUM BOROSILICATE, POLYVINYL BUTYRAL, ACRYLATES COPOLYMER, STEARALKONIUM BENTONITE, SHELLAC CERA/SHELLAC WAX/CIRA DE LAQUE, DIHYDROXYETHYL COCAMINE OXIDE, BENZOPHENONE-3, SILICA, TIN OXIDE, [May Contain/Peut Contenir/+/-:MICA, TITANIUM DIOXIDE (CI 77891), IRON OXIDES (CI 77491, CI 77492, CI 77499), D&C RED NO. 6 BARIUM LAKE (CI 15850), D&C RED NO. 7 CALCIUM LAKE (CI 15850), FD&C BLUE NO. 1 ALUMINUM LAKE (CI 42090), FD&C YELLOW NO. 5 ALUMINUM LAKE (CI 19140), D&C YELLOW NO. 10 ALUMINUM LAKE (CI 47005), D&C ORANGE NO. 5 (CI 45370), D&C YELLOW NO. 11 (CI 47000), D&C RED NO. 22 (CI 45380), D&C RED NO. 28 (CI 45410), ULTRAMARINES (CI 77007), FERRIC AMMONIUM FERROCYANIDE (CI 77510), ALUMINUM POWDER (CI 77000)].

Image credit: Sally Hansen

If you’d like to try being a “stripper” you can buy Nail Effects with the Amazon link below. Your purchase will help support the Beauty Brains and for that we thank you kindly.

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Celebrity Hair & Makeup: Dianna Agron at 2012 Golden Globe Awards

January 17th, 2012

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Nothing beats a chic updo with a red lip on the red carpet. See how you can recreate Dianna Agron‘s look at the 69th Annual Golden Globe Awards! Makeup Makeup artist Monika Blunder was inspired by the spring 2012 fashion shows where the makeup was fresh but still very glamorous. Since Dianna’s red Giles dress […]

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Get the Red Out of Your Life – Treating Rosacea

December 16th, 2011

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Today’s post is written by Debra Jaliman, MD, author of Skin Rules:  Trade Secrets from a Top New York Dermatologist.  

Every day I treat rosacea. It’s probably one of the most common skin conditions that dermatologists see. New patients either walk in with bright red faces or with caked-on makeup that still manages to do a poor job of concealment. The good news is that nowadays, nobody has to walk around with a scarlet face, since there is an ever-growing number of effective treatment options.

First, though, a prolonged question-and-answer period with your doctor should take place. The first thing your dermatologist will ask about is your diet. Food and drink are usually the prime triggers in rosacea. Everybody is different and so are rosacea triggers, but here is a list of the most common offenders:

  • Spicy foods
  • Piping hot beverages — better get used to drinking soups at a cooler temperature.
  • Caffeine — coffee, tea and, I’m afraid, chocolate.
  • Citrus fruits
  • Tomatoes (including ketchup)
  • Red wine and beer. White wine appears to be less of a problem.
  • Soy sauce and miso
  • Steam — saunas and very hot, prolonged showers and baths are not good.
  • Excessive niacin (vitamin B3) consumption which leads to skin flushing. Low doses or
    taking the non-flushing type of niacin should not cause problems.
  • Sun exposure
  • Wind
  • Extremes in temperature — very hot weather and very cold weather make rosacea worse, as anybody who has a scarlet nose in winter knows.

As is obvious from the last two items, protecting the skin from the elements is essential. But you have to do it the right way — chemical sunscreens will only make rosacea worse. I recommend sunscreens with zinc oxide, which is both anti-inflammatory and provides good, broad-spectrum protection. Make sure it is SPF 30 or higher and slather it on every single day, even on overcast days.

Skincare products can also exacerbate rosacea. Use the mildest cleanser you can find. Avoid products with glycolic or salicylic acid. Stay away from makeup with silicone-based ingredients, such as dimethicone, which can clog pores and make rosacea bumps worse.

Dermatologists have a wide arsenal of weapons against rosacea. The first line of attack is with topical products. In my practice, I first treat the inflammation and dryness, using creams and serums with resveratrol, green tea and hyaluronic acid. Topical antibiotics, such as metronidazole, kill bacteria on the skin surface and lessen inflammation, as can prescription-strength azelaic acid. With severe cases, oral antibiotics can be used. The FDA recently approved the use of doxycycline in very small doses to treat inflammation in rosacea patients; sometimes the course of low-dose antibiotics can go on for months. Most people seem to tolerate it well, but others will have side effects, in which case topical antibiotics, light therapy and lasers are the fall-back answers.

Light therapy can have amazing results. I use a combination of red, infra-red and blue light, typically in sessions lasting between 30 minutes and an hour. The procedure is completely painless and most patients begin to see an improvement after the first session or two.

The next step is using lasers, which are more expensive than light therapy, but worth it. In my practice I use the Genesis laser to reduce background redness. My patients tell me it feels like warm water is being applied and actually seem to find it relaxing. Skin may look pink right after treatment, but that fades in a few minutes. I usually recommend three to six treatments, although most patients see a big difference by the third treatment.

Broken blood vessels that look like red spider webs are common in rosacea patients. The CoolGlide laser is used to seal off the vessels in one to three treatments, four weeks apart. It’s not the pleasant experience of the Genesis laser, but the discomfort is minimal and any redness from the treatment is gone in twenty minutes.

Once rosacea has been brought under control, most patients report they find it easy to avoid their triggers. “I finally feel in control of my skin,” one of them told me recently.

© 2011 Debra Jaliman, MD, author of Skin Rules: Trade Secrets from a Top New York Dermatologist

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DIY Halloween Makeup Tips & Tricks

October 23rd, 2011

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By Dustin Hunter, Washington, Makeup Artist

Born and raised in the Pacific Northwest, Dustin Hunter has been designing various media since his early teen years. Studying several different art forms, Hunter’s creative background ranges from illustration and photography to fashion and interior design to music production and makeup artistry. As a makeup artist, Dustin Hunter combines his love of music and visual art to construct images of experimental beauty for both stage and photography; creating avant-garde makeup looks for photographers, performers and musicians. Check out his blog and YouTube channel, plus read his full bio.


DIY Halloween Makeup Tips & Tricks

Before my kitchen refrigerator was stocked with fake blood and scab material, I relied on some pretty creative ways to make my own FX supplies. With Halloween just around the corner, some of us may be freaking out and thinking we’ve run out of time to put a costume together, but here are a few DIY tips that I STILL use to this day (even with a fridge full of gore) for last minute costumes:

Matte Eyeshadows | If you’re going to create bruises or dirty, rough, and irritated skin, matte eyeshadows in shades like lime green, mustard yellow, violet, dark brown and blue are must-haves! Any amount of frost or shimmer will give the illusion away in an instant so stick with matte finishes.

Burgundy Lipstick | Highly pigmented, dark red lipstick not only mimics the look of blood quite well (particularly for scraps and small cuts) but also stays where you place it, making it a good choice for long-wearing blood effects.

Luffas and Bath Scrunchies | If you don’t have access to a stippling sponge, a cut up Luffa or tightly-wound bath scrunchie will work to create the look of broken capillaries. Dip the edges into your dark red lipstick and stamp onto the skin.

Food Coloring and Light Corn Syrup | Add several drops of red and just a smidgen of blue for realistic fake blood! Add a small amount of water if you really need the stuff to flow, or if you know your way around a kitchen, you can reduce the mixture over heat (to the “soft ball” stage) for some pretty snazzy homemade scab material! Remember, blood comes in different shades of red (arterial blood is brighter than the blood from veins), so mix accordingly.

Eyelash Adhesive | It’s actually liquid latex. Spread a thin layer onto the skin and start picking and scratching it–be careful though, it’s still your skin you’re scratching at! Fill in the “holes” in your skin with that dark red lipstick to create a nice “road rash” effect!

MORE Eyelash Adhesive and Cotton | Thin strips of cotton (pulled from buds or cotton balls) can be placed on the skin over your lash glue. Set those strips with another layer of glue and you’ll have instant raised scarring!

Hairspray | If you do something cool, you’ll want to make sure it sticks around by using a makeup sealer. I love Final Seal by Ben Nye (Benefit’s She-Laq is nice but pricey). But if you’re in a pinch, reach for the hairspray. A light mist will do the job; just don’t tell your dermatologist I told you to put it on your face.

If you can stomach it, do a few image searches in your favorite search engine for words like “bruise,” “broken capillaries,” and “scrapes and cuts” for inspiration. The best way to learn how to create something realistic looking is to see how it looks… in reality.

See more photos!




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