Posts Tagged ‘product’

Is more expensive eye shadow really different?

June 6th, 2014

Celebrity Makeup News and Blogs:

Mamasim asks…Can the processes (methods) as opposed to ingredients, of producing a beauty product be different enough to justify the price differences in the same product type? A makeup artist I like commented in a tutorial that the reason she liked Dior eyeshadows is they have a wonderful texture. She said that when she asked a cosmetic chemist why they said it was because during its production the product was held at the ‘fat combining’ stage for slightly longer than is the norm… (???) I’m interested in knowing if high end companies use more involved methods and this is a reason why their products can be more expensive?

The Beauty Brains respond:

The only unusual “fat combining” process that I’m aware of is the way Perry eats a hamburger and french fries. He eats ALL the fries first THEN he eats the burger.  Isn’t it normal to intersperse bites of the burger with the fries so you can enjoy the flavor of both?  I mean you wouldn’t eat your entire bag of potato chips and THEN eat your ham sandwich, would you? Sheesh! But I digress…

Processing can impact product cost

While we stress the importance of looking at ingredients to understand the quality of a product, there are situations where the ingredients don’t tell the full story. Sometimes HOW the ingredients are put together can be tremendously important to the quality of the finished product. You don’t see this in simple mixtures, like shampoos, but you do see it on more complex products like pressed powders. Case in point: a recent article in Cosmetics & Toiletries revealed that the quality of a powder cosmetic products depends in part on how the powders are pulverized.

The powders used in cosmetics can form agglomerates, or clumps. These clumps prevent the powder from having a smooth application. To avoid these clumps powders are processed to break them into tiny particles. This is commonly done using a piece of equipment called a “Hammer Mill” which basically slams metal hammers against the powder’s surface to break the pieces apart. Most manufacturers used to this type of equipment.

However a more advanced process, known as “Jet Milling,” can break the particles into even smaller sizes and make them more spherical.

Not surprisingly Jet Mills cost more, and not as readily available, as Hammer Mills. That means if a company wants to make a higher quality powder they either have to invest in more expensive equipment or they have to use a contract manufacturer which owns this specialized grinder. In either case the use of jet milling to create a softer feeling product results in an increased price. Therefore it’s unlikely you’ll see this used in bargain products.

So the answer is yes, process can impact cost.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+StumbleUponShare

Go to Source

Please note that this article is not written by celebritymakeup.org

Which kind of vitamin C is best for skin? The Beauty Brains Show episode 31

May 20th, 2014

Celebrity Makeup News and Blogs:

What’s the best kind of vitamin C for skin? Plus: Randy and I talk about the experimental MINK makeup printer.

Click below to play Episode 31 or click “download” to save the MP3 file to your computer.

Show notes

Beauty Science News

3D printing comes to cosmetics! This week we discuss the pros and cons of the new MINK makeup printer.

Question of the week: What kind of vitamin C works best on skin?

Illdiko (from Hungary) asks..I really love vitamin C serums, but I would like to use them properly. Do vitamin C products really need a special low pH? And what about their derivates, like Magnesium Ascorbyl Phosphate and others? Which vitamin C ingredient is the best?”

What’s the deal with Vitamin C?

Vitamin C is a chemical called ascorbic acid that is naturally occurring in skin. It is known to play a role in collagen production. In addition, when topically applied it is thought to help heal acne, increase the barrier function of skin to decrease moisture loss, protect from UV radiation, and prevent age spots.

Sounds too good to be true, huh? Well there is a downside – it’s difficult to deliver VC to skin in a form that is stable, effective and non-irritating.

There are something like 7 or 8 different forms of VC that are used in cosmetics and there’s a LOT of noise out there about how the different versions work, how much to use, what kind of formula is required to deliver the ingredient, and so forth.

So, today, we’re going to try to get to the bottom of that mess by reviewing the best scientific data available on each ingredient. And we’ll do that using the three Kligman questions format that we’ve used before. Randy, want to describe that again for our readers?

How to prove an anti-aging ingredient works – the Kligman questions

1. Based on the chemistry of the ingredient, is there any scientific mechanism that could explain why it would work?
2. Does it penetrate to the part of the skin where it needs to be in order to work?
3. Are there peer reviewed, double blind, placebo controlled studies demonstrating the ingredient really works when applied to real people?

Our assessment is based primarily on a paper which reviews the technical literature on Vitamin C through 2012: “Stability, transdermal penetration and cutaneous effects of ascorbic acid and its derivatives” from the Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology, 2012.

Let’s start by discussion the mechanism. Remember the active form is ascorbic acid so all the derivatives must be converted to ascorbic acid on the skin.

Is there a mechanism that explains how Vitamin C works?

Remember that unlike many other anti aging ingredients, Vitamin C is naturally found in skin (mostly in the epidermis, some in the dermis) and it’s role in skin biology is well documented. For example…

Protecting from UV damage
Although VC is NOT a sunscreen but it protects skin from the free radicals that are caused by UV exposure. It’s been shown to reduce lipid peroxidation, limit the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, protect against apoptosis (or cell death) and to reduce redox-sensitive cell signaling. All this means that VC reduces many of the nasty effects of sun exposure.

Increasing collagen to reduce wrinkles
As you know collagen collapse is a major cause of wrinkles. Vitamin C regulates the synthesis of collagen and it does this by hydroxylating collagen which makes it more stable and improves the way it supports the epidermis.

Reducing skin pigmentation
VC not only reduces melanin production but it also reduces oxidation of the melanin that is produced. It’s also thought to reverse the conversion of DOPA to o-DOPA quinone (which is a skin pigment).

So, as you can see, the effects of VC in the skin are well understood. Now let’s look at the other properties of each ingredient and what kind of data is available to prove that they work.

Ascorbic Acid (AA)

Is it Stable? Stable at pH less than 3.5 in aqueous solution and it’s stable in anhydrous systems

Does it penetrate? Ex vivo testing proves it penetrates as a solution or micro particles

Does it convert to Ascorbic Acid? No conversion required.

Protects from UV damage: Yes, human in vivo testing.

Increases collagen synthesis: Yes, human in vivo testing.

Reduces skin pigmentation: Yes, human in vivo testing.

So this ingredient is the gold standard for Vitamin C. However because it’s often used at very low pH it can be harsh to skin which has lead to the development of other versions of AA. For example….

Sodium Ascorbyl Phosphate (SAP)

Is it Stable? Stable at pH 7

Does it penetrate? There is limited ex vivo animal testing which shows it penetrates.

Does it convert to Ascorbic Acid? There is no data showing it converts to AA.

Protects from UV damage: Yes, human in vivo testing shows is protects but less effective than AA.

Increases collagen synthesis: Yes, in vitro testing only and it’s less effective than MAP.

Reduces skin pigmentation: Yes, human in vivo testing (but from trade journal only so the data may be less robust.)

Magnesium Ascorbyl Phosphate (MAP)

Is it Stable?  Stable at pH 7

Does it penetrate? Yes it penetrates, but data is limited to ex vivo animal testing.

Does it convert to Ascorbic Acid? In vitro testing indicates it converts to AA.

Protects from UV damage: No data.

Increases collagen synthesis: Yes but only in vitro testing. Apparently equally as effective as AA.

Reduces skin pigmentation: Yes, human in vivo testing.

Ascorbyl Palmitate (AA-PAL)

Is it Stable? Same stability issues as AA (requires low pH or anhydrous system.)

Does it penetrate? In vivo animal testing shows it penetrates but it’s very dependent upon the formula.

Does it converts to Ascorbic Acid?  No data showing that it converts.

Protects from UV damage: Yes, animal in vivo testing shows it protects from UV.

Increases collagen synthesis: Yes, but in vitro testing only.

Reduces skin pigmentation: No data showing that it works.

Ascorbyl Tetra-Isopalmitate (VC-IP)

Is it Stable? It’s stable at pH less than 5.

Does it penetrate? According to a trade publication, human ex vivo testing shows it penetrates better than MAP.

Does it converts to Ascorbic Acid? In vitro testing shows it converts to AA.

Protects from UV damage: Yes but in vitro data only.

Increases collagen synthesis: Yes but in vitro data only.

Reduces skin pigmentation: Yes, human in vivo testing (according to trade journal.)

Ascorbyl Glucoside (AA-2G)

Is it Stable? Yes, stable at a range of pH.

Does it penetrate? In vitro testing shows it penetrates.

Does it converts to Ascorbic Acid? In vitro testing shows it converts to AA.

Protects from UV damage: Yes, human in vivo testing shows it protects but it’s less effective than SAP.

Increases collagen synthesis: Yes but in vitro data only.

Reduces skin pigmentation: In vitro testing shows it diminishes dark spots. 

Ascorbyl 2-Phosphate 6-Palmitate (APPS)

Is it Stable? Stable at pH 7

Does it penetrate? In vivo animal data shows it penetrates.

Does it converts to Ascorbic Acid? In vitro data shows it converts to AA.

Protects from UV damage: No data.

Increases collagen synthesis: No data.

Reduces skin pigmentation: Yes, human in vivo data shows it diminishes dark spots.

3-O-Ethyl Ascorbate (EAC)

Is it Stable? No published data on stability.

Does it penetrate? Ex vivo animal testing shows it penetrates better than AA-2G.

Does it converts to Ascorbic Acid? No published data showing it converts to AA.

Protects from UV damage: No data.

Increases collagen synthesis: No data.  

Reduces skin pigmentation: Human in vivo data shows it works against dark spots.

Tip #1 for finding the best product: Ask for Ascorbic Acid

This much is clear: of all the Vitamin C derivatives, Ascorbic Acid has the best data to prove that it really works for all three main functions. So, if possible, why wouldn’t you use AA?

That doesn’t mean that ANY product with AA on the label will be best. There are other factors at play…Which brings us to tip #2…

Tip #2 for finding the best product: Concentrate on the concentration

So how much AA should a product contain?

According to the Pauling Inst. the maximum skin absorption occurs at 20%. Higher concentrations actually have less absorption. Which is good since high concentrations are also more irritating.

Should you go lower? Paula Begon says that a proven range for vitamin C effectiveness is generally between 0.3% and 10%. 0.3 is a LONG way from the maximum absorption of 20% so that seems low.

If you can stand the irritation, 10% or even 15% should give better absorption.

Tip #3 for finding the best product: Watch out for water

AA can begin to oxide (which causes it to be used up) as soon as it’s dissolved in water. Look for products where water is NOT one of the first ingredients. That gives you a better chance of finding a product that will really work. That means looks for serums instead of cream based products.

Also, if water is present, look for products that use stabilizing agents – Paula’s Choice is good for this.

Tip #4 for finding the best product: Look for low pH

As we noted, AA is unstable above 3.5 or so. Look for low pH products. Of course pH is only meaningful if water is present so it’s less of an issue in the kinds of water free formulas we just discussed.

Tip #5 for finding the best product: Purchase proper packaging

Any Vitamin C ingredient must be properly packaged to protect it from excess light and air.

Look for pump packaging (or individually sealed single use capsules) to protect from air. I would even avoid products in plastic tubes unless you know they’re used some kind of laminate to act as a barrier to oxygen transmission.

Avoid clear packages to protect from light. If it’s a glass jar make it dark.

Bonus tips:

Watch out for irritation

As we said, AA can cause redness and stinging. Be prepared to switch to another type if irritation is to great. The alternative may be less effective but you’ll be likely to use it more often if it’s gentle to your skin.

Don’t rush it!

After applying a VC product you should wait a while before applying any other products.

That’s because other ingredients can trigger oxidation and if they’re applied on top of the AA before it can be absorbed into your skin it could become inactive.

The Beauty Brains bottom line

So based on the data we’ve seen, ascorbic acid is the best version of  Vitamin C to use in an anti-aging product.

But, just having ascorbic acid on the ingredient list doesn’t make a product “the best.” A well formulated product based on other derivatives could be better than a poorly formulated product based on ascorbic acid.

You need to keep in mind that the efficacy of any vitamin C based product depends on not only the type of Vitamin C, but also the concentration, the other ingredients in the formula and the packaging.

But following our 5 tips should help you pick a product that’s more likely to work at a price you can afford.

LIL buy it now button

Buy your copy of It’s OK to Have Lead in Your Lipstick to learn more about:

  • Clever lies that the beauty companies tell you.
  • The straight scoop of which beauty myths are true and which are just urban legends.
  • Which ingredients are really scary and which ones are just scaremongering by the media to incite an irrational fear of chemicals.
  • How to tell the difference between the products that are really green and the ones that are just trying to get more of your hard earned money by labeling them “natural” or “organic.

Click here for all the The Beauty Brains podcasts.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+StumbleUponShare

Go to Source

Please note that this article is not written by celebritymakeup.org

Vintage cosmetic video – can makeup make skin better?

March 21st, 2014

Celebrity Makeup News and Blogs:

Even though this commercial is listed on YouTube under “vintage cosmetics” it’s only three years old. I guess vintage is in the eye of the beholder. Nonetheless it does contain a very interesting claim that one normally doesn’t see associated with makeup.

According to Jennifer Garner “It makes your skin look better even after you take it off.” She then offers this fact as proof: “98% of women saw improvement in skin’s natural texture. tone, and clarity.” How is this possible? Can makeup really make skin healthier?

The answer probably has something to do with the product’s active ingredient, titanium dioxide. You see, this product has an SPF of 20. So it’s not hard to imagine a test which could show that skin that has been protected with this product is in better condition than bare skin.

Of course the commercial gives no indication of HOW MUCH of an improvement women saw. Still, it’s a clever execution of an ingredient based claim.

And just think, in only another 17 years this product really WILL be vintage!

FacebookTwitterGoogle+StumbleUponShare

Go to Source

Please note that this article is not written by celebritymakeup.org

Kiehl’s Olive Fruit Oil Nourishing Conditioner – how to find a cheaper version

February 8th, 2014

Celebrity Makeup News and Blogs:

Miriam asks..I’m looking for a conditioner similar to Olive Fruit Oil Nourishing Conditioner from Kiehls, could you recommend something cheaper?

The Beauty Brains respond:

Miriam’s question comes from the boards on Makeup Alley where we’ve been contributing recently. It’s the most active online beauty community we’ve ever seen – if you haven’t checked it out already you should!

Use the “Rule of 5 Ingredients”

Of course there’s no way to know for sure without testing but we can identify good candidates for Miriam to try just by looking at the ingredients list (see below.) In particular, look at the first five ingredients:

Water, cetearyl alcohol, behentrimonium chloride, glycerin, amodimethicone

Water is the solvent/carrier and will be the first ingredient in any emulsion-type conditioner. The cetearyl alcohol is the “body” of the product and is a mix of cetyl alcohol and stearyl alcohol. (Remember that these so-called fatty alcohols are NOT the kind of alcohol that dries your hair.) Behentrimonium chloride and amodimethicone are both excellent conditioners which are chemically modified to stick to the damaged spots on your hair after rinsing. Glycerin is a good moisturizing agent although it really doesn’t do much from a rinse out product.

A quick scan for products with similar ingredients reveals that Loreal Nature’s Therapy Mega Hair Moisture Treatment has the same five ingredients in the same order (see below.) It also contains a few lesser ingredients which may give the product a different feel like cetyl esters and cetrimonium chloride. Most of the other differences, like the preservative,  won’t impact the performance of the product.

The Kiehl’s product sells for about $2.26 per ounce ($19 for 8.4 ounces) while the L’Oreal “dupe” is only  $1.40 per ounce ($11.21 for 8 ounces). So if you’re looking for a cheaper option, the L’Oreal product should be a good one to check out.

Loreal Nature’s Therapy Mega Hair Moisture Treatment ingredients

Water, Cetearyl Alcohol, Behentrimonium Chloride, Glycerin, Amodimethicone, Cetyl Esters, Sodium PCA, Fragrance, Methylparaben, Trideceth-12, Sunflower Seed Oil, Chlorhexidine, Dihydrochloride, Cetrimonium Chloride, Yellow 5.

Kiehl’s Olive Fruit Oil Nourishing Conditioner

Water, cetearyl alcohol, behentrimonium chloride, glycerin, amodimethicone, olea europaea (olive) fruit oil, persea gratissima (avocado) oil, trideceth-6, 2-oleamido-1, 3-octadecanediol, lanolin, citrus limonum (lemon) peel oil, cetyl esters, methylparaben, chlorhexidine dihydrochloride, cetrimonium chloride, dimethyl tin dineodecyl ester, fragrance.

Do YOU have any favorite products you’d like to find a cheaper version of? Leave a comment and we’ll try to track one down for you.

Go to Source

Please note that this article is not written by celebritymakeup.org

Vintage cosmetic video: Can Neutrogena makeup improve skin texture?

October 25th, 2013

Celebrity Makeup News and Blogs:

Even though this commercial is listed on YouTube under “vintage cosmetics” it’s only three years old. I guess vintage is in the eye of the beholder. Nonetheless it does contain a very interesting claim that one normally doesn’t see associated with makeup.

According to Jennifer Garner “It makes your skin look better even after you take it off.” She then offers this fact as proof: “98% of women saw improvement in skin’s natural texture. tone, and clarity.” How is this possible? Can makeup really make skin healthier?

The answer probably has something to do with the product’s active ingredient, titanium dioxide. You see, this product has an SPF of 20. So it’s not hard to imagine a test which could show that skin that has been protected with this product is in better condition than bare skin.

Of course the commercial gives no indication of HOW MUCH of an improvement women saw. Still, it’s a clever execution of an ingredient based claim.

And just think, in only another 17 years this product really WILL be vintage!

Go to Source

Please note that this article is not written by celebritymakeup.org