Posts Tagged ‘lead’

Are counterfeit cosmetics safe?

December 27th, 2013

Celebrity Makeup News and Blogs:

Tatyana says… I have been sent two fake makeup palettes that are meant to be Urban Decay, and these fakes are really ubiquitous. As I am a scientist as well, I did notice fairly quickly a few ways to identify fakes besides the aesthetics and scripts with lot numbers. One of my fakes did have an obvious ‘Beauty with ay edge’ typo on the box and insert. Anyway, I love makeup, and I love the hyper-pigmented, super saturated colour that Urban Decay often employs. I do realise some of the cost of cosmetics is in the development and quality control of the product, but is there any significant difference in the quality of the pigments? I do know that the costs of pigments for fine arts painting can be significantly different, and I have always assumed that is due to the nature of the pigment, for example, yellow ochre, cheap, some of the bright, lime greens (I can’t remember the name right now, something like phallocyanate green), expensive. As well, some young women just think it is great to be able to get cheap fake cosmetics, they don’t think there is an issue. Can you elaborate on some of the issues with fakes please? As well, is there any distinction between fake cosmetics and what a lot of them are calling ‘cosmetics from Hong Kong’.

The Beauty Brains respond:

In the US (and many other countries) pigments are certified to ensure that they don’t contain any dangerous contaminants. This requires a more elaborate process of manufacturing and record keeping but it does ensure that colorants are safe. Some counterfeit products made outside of the US (or other regulated countries) have been found to contain pigments with high levels of lead, for example. While trace levels of lead are common (and not very dangerous) high levels of lead does pose a problem. So it’s possible that some unscrupulous companies are selling these cheap knock-offs rather than using pigments that have been properly quality control checked.

From what I understand, a number of these counterfeit products come from China so I assume that the term “cosmetics from Hong Kong” is just another way to refer to such fakes. (Of course that is not to say that ALL fakes come from China or that every Chinese product is fake.)

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Please note that this article is not written by celebritymakeup.org

The Beauty Brains Show Episode 02 – Toxic mayhem in makeup

November 22nd, 2013

Celebrity Makeup News and Blogs:

A recent article published on the Huffington Post by Amy Ziff claimed that makeup contaminated with lead is one of the “scariest things kids may encounter this Halloween” and could lead to “toxic mayhem.”

In this week’s show we discuss the inaccuracies presented in this article along with documented references where the correct information can be found.

Click below to play Episode 002: “Toxic Mayhem in makeup” or click “download” to save the MP3 file to your computer.

Show notes

Here is the list of the points we covered in today’s Showgram. Click here for a transcript of the discussion which includes links to all the references.

1. “Because of the fact that the cosmetics industry is not regulated by the FDA, there are no laws based on levels that are safe for makeup.”

2. “Lead is banned from makeup in both Canada and Europe but it’s allowed AT ANY LEVEL in makeup in the U.S.”

3. “…there are numerous other paths of exposure [to lead] and makeup is a critical one.”

4. “Since we absorb as much as 80 percent of what goes on our skin, the precautionary principal tells us it’s not smart to coat ourselves with things containing lead.”

5. “Lead in lipstick has been a known issue for years and the FDA continues to do periodic tests which only show more lead in lipstick…”
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Buy your copy of It’s OK to Have Lead in Your Lipstick to learn more about:

  • Clever lies that the beauty companies tell you.
  • The straight scoop of which beauty myths are true and which are just urban legends.
  • Which ingredients are really scary and which ones are just scaremongering by the media to incite an irrational fear of chemicals.
  • How to tell the difference between the products that are really green and the ones that are just trying to get more of your hard earned money by labeling them “natural” or “organic.

Click here for all the The Beauty Brains podcasts.

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Please note that this article is not written by celebritymakeup.org

Toxic Halloween makeup – should you be afraid?

October 30th, 2013

Celebrity Makeup News and Blogs:

Post image for Toxic Halloween makeup – should you be afraid?

In this weeks’s Beauty Brains show we discussed the Huff Po article on toxic makeup. Here’s a transcript (or at least a summary) of the points we covered.

1. “Because of the fact that the cosmetics industry is not regulated by the FDA, there are no laws based on levels that are safe for makeup.”

Truth: Consumer advocacy groups frequently claim that the cosmetic industry is unregulated. This is false. The regulatory framework for the cosmetic industry was set up in 1938 with the passage of the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. This created the FDA which is who regulates the cosmetic industry.

Source: http://www.fda.gov/Cosmetics/default.htm

2. “Lead is banned from makeup in both Canada and Europe but it’s allowed AT ANY LEVEL in makeup in the U.S.”

Truth: The Cosmetics Directive in the European Union specifically bans lead as an ingredient while in the US lead is NOT included as an approved ingredient in the Cosmetic Dictionary. In other words, lead is not allowed as an ingredient in EITHER country. (The exception in the US is lead acetate which is allowed as a color additive but products containing this ingredient must be clearly with the following warning statement: “CAUTION: Contains lead acetate. For external use only.”)

It’s also true in both the US and EU that cosmetics contain trace amounts of lead – there’s a big difference between adding lead as an ingredient and having trace amounts of lead present as in impurity.

Sources:

https://www.cosmeticseurope.eu/safety-and-science-cosmetics-europe/products-and-ingredients/common-myths-about-some-ingredients-.html

http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?fr=73.2396

3. “…there are numerous other paths of exposure [to lead] and makeup is a critical one.”

Truth: According to the American Cancer Society, the main routes of exposure to lead are breathing and ingestion. Other than the exception of kohl eye makeup, which is known to contain high amounts of lead (and which is NOT allowed in the US), makeup is not cited as a “critical” concern for lead exposure. If you’re really worried about protecting children from lead then don’t let them eat any candy (which is allowed by the FDA to contain up to 0.5 ppm of lead) or drink tap water (which is allowed by the EPA to contain up to 15 ppb lead.) Since candy and water are directly ingested, the potential for lead exposure is MUCH greater from these sources than from makeup which is poorly absorbed by skin, if at all.

Sources:

http://www.cancer.org/cancer/cancercauses/othercarcinogens/athome/lead

http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/lead/tips/water.htm

http://www.foodnavigator-usa.com/Regulation/FDA-issues-new-guidance-on-lead-in-candy

4. “Since we absorb as much as 80 percent of what goes on our skin, the precautionary principal tells us it’s not smart to coat ourselves with things containing lead.”

Truth: In reality our skin is an effective barrier against most materials and very little of what is applied topically actually makes it through the skin into the blood. The notion that 80% of whatever goes on skin is absorbed is not accurate.

Source: http://thebeautybrains.com/2013/04/30/do-cosmetic-ingredients-really-absorb-into-the-blood-stream-in-26-seconds/

5. “Lead in lipstick has been a known issue for years and the FDA continues to do periodic tests which only show more lead in lipstick…”

Truth: Actually last two studies (using the method validated by the FDA) show a consistent amount of lead present in lipstick, not “more” lead. The first study, from 2009 showed an average of 1.07 ppm while the most recent study 2012 showed 1.11 ppm. From a statistical perspective this is not an increase in lead.

Source: http://www.fda.gov/Cosmetics/ProductandIngredientSafety/ProductInformation/ucm137224.htm#expanalyses

The bottom line
Let’s be clear: lead poisoning IS a serious problem. But the amount of lead and other potentially dangerous materials in cosmetics is controlled through a combination of government restrictions and industry self-regulation. Lead is not allowed as an ingredient in the US or the EU but it is allowed in cosmetics at trace levels. These amounts of lead are very low and the amount of that lead that enters our bodies from these products is even less. Therefore the risk of lead poisoning from cosmetics is VERY low. Our kids are exposed to greater amounts of lead from candy and water than from makeup.

Image credit: http://upload.wikimedia.org

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Please note that this article is not written by celebritymakeup.org

The Beauty Brains Show Episode 002 – Toxic mayhem in makeup

October 30th, 2013

Celebrity Makeup News and Blogs:

Post image for The Beauty Brains Show Episode 002 – Toxic mayhem in makeup

A recent article published on the Huffington Post by Amy Ziff claimed that makeup contaminated with lead is one of the “scariest things kids may encounter this Halloween” and could lead to “toxic mayhem.”

In this week’s show we discuss the inaccuracies presented in this article along with documented references where the correct information can be found.

Click below to play Episode 002: “Toxic Mayhem in makeup” or click “download” to save the MP3 file to your computer.

Show notes

Here is the list of the points we covered in today’s Showgram.  Click here for a transcript of the discussion which includes links to all the references.

1. “Because of the fact that the cosmetics industry is not regulated by the FDA, there are no laws based on levels that are safe for makeup.”

2. “Lead is banned from makeup in both Canada and Europe but it’s allowed AT ANY LEVEL in makeup in the U.S.”

3. “…there are numerous other paths of exposure [to lead] and makeup is a critical one.”

4. “Since we absorb as much as 80 percent of what goes on our skin, the precautionary principal tells us it’s not smart to coat ourselves with things containing lead.”

5. “Lead in lipstick has been a known issue for years and the FDA continues to do periodic tests which only show more lead in lipstick…”

LIL buy it now button

Buy your copy of It’s OK to Have Lead in Your Lipstick to learn more about:

  • Clever lies that the beauty companies tell you.
  • The straight scoop of which beauty myths are true and which are just urban legends.
  • Which ingredients are really scary and which ones are just scaremongering by the media to incite an irrational fear of chemicals.
  • How to tell the difference between the products that are really green and the ones that are just trying to get more of your hard earned money by labeling them “natural” or “organic.

Click here for all the The Beauty Brains podcasts.

Go to Source

Please note that this article is not written by celebritymakeup.org